Secure your windows today
Get the most ideas for doors & windows right here! Installing doors & windows has never been easier with this online guide.

House windows come in many different types, like shutter, wood, screen, storm and metal sliding. Great tips on re-modeling your home windows.

Find window hardware for your doors & windows with hot links to the most cost efficient house windows and more.

Read advice on patio doors & windows for your home.

Patio Doors
If you have a beautiful garden or yard to show off, try installing a patio door, or a sliding window.

Patio doors make access to your backyard easy and secure. A patio door slides open and closed on adjustable rollers that work in tandem.

Sliding windows can be useful for letting fresh air into your home on great days, and closing out bad weather on rainy days.

Screens can be placed on horizontal sliding windows in order to prevent bugs from entering your home. If you’re looking for more style, try looking at a 35-degree garden window.

Patio doors and sliding windows are available in a variety of models.

Models
Sliding windows are available in two distinct models, allowing you to select the level of ventilation that you want.

Single or double sliding options are available from most of the quality manufacturers in our buyers guide.

Manufactured patio door models are available in 2- or 3-lite configurations, with an operable panel available in any position.

3-lite sliding window models come with operable end vents.

Grades of Glass
One of the most important window features is the grade of glass. Choose your windows carefully since sometimes choosing cost over quality can affect the longevity and look of your window.

Here are some commonly used types of door & window glass:

Clear
Low-E
Heat absorbing
Reflective
Low emissivity glass allows light to enter the house, but keeps out the heat. Energy efficient heat absorbing glass works in the other direction. It keeps heat from escaping your home.

Reflective glass is coated with film to reduce glare, while art glass is coated to create a custom look.

Single pane and double pane glass can also contribute to the security level of your home. Single pane doesn’t have a lot of insulating value and it is easier to break.

Use our buyers guide to find more glass options like dualplane, triplane, super triple E with ALPHA-10, BR50 and more insulating systems.

Manufacturers
Check out the links to these quality manufacturers in our online buyer’s guide: Andersen, Pella, Marvin, Traco, Jeld-Wen, Stegbar, Willmar, SilverLine, Tiptop, Simonton, and more.

More great models available from Bristol, Ellison, Craftsman, Weathertamer, Milgard, Certainteed, InvisibleStorms, WeatherSheild, and Gorell.

Find the most options for window hardware with a large selection of colors, dividers and patterns with this online guide to replacement windows.

Let the fresh air in and save energy with casement windows
Replace leaking, energy stealing windows with casement windows! Window replacement can save you money in the long run.

If you’re considering a window replacement, then take a look at the qualities and benefits of wood windows. You can even find wood casement windows.

Casement windows allow you to use the style of screen and the glass quality that you prefer in your home. Window replacement is a great idea for any room in your home.

Find great reviews right here, on popular manufacturers of casement and custom made wood windows.

Casement
Windows which are hinged at the sides, are classified as “casement”. Generally, although superior to slider windows, casements have a lower level of air leakage throughout your house.

A casement window is ideal for allowing fresh air to circulate through your home all year round. With a casement window, you don’t have to worry about drafts or insects getting in.

Casement windows are an ideal way to:

Save energy
Ventilate rooms
Seal in heat
The most important feature of a casement window is its ventilation option. The casement window projects outward, unlike sliders, enabling fresh air to flow through your home when needed.

Remember that with casement windows, screens are places on the inside of the window.

Awning
An awning serves the same purpose as a casement window, it allows air to circulate through the house.

The difference between a casement and an awning system is in the hinges. An awning is hinged at the top of the window and opens outward.

Hinged windows maintain the heat energy of the house during colder weather. Unlike sliders, the sash presses up against the frame to prevent air from leaking in.

Models
With several manufactured models to choose from, you have the choice of a single, double or triple vent casement window system. You may even find quad casement ventilation.

A window is composed of a head jamb, side jambs, and a bottom sash line that parallels the window sill. These lines create the structure of a window frame.

Brush up on your window terminology so that you can identify casement and awning features.

Casement and awning windows feature a sash lock, operator handle, side jambs, and full screen standards. If you don’t want an operable venting system then try installing a fixed frame.

Casement and awning windows are most common in 2-lite components.

Wood Features
Many manufacturers support the idea that wood framing is the best to use around windows.

A wood replacement window absorbs and captures heat so well that it maintains a high R-value. Wood is made to last long in all climates and stays strong against the elements.

Wood is less prone to condensation and unaffected by extremes in weather and temperature. This creates great value for your investment.

A wood frame is also beautiful to look at and offers a classy and modern look. With wood frames you can choose any color of stain for your wood windows, colors from beige to deep red. Matching shutters and storm shields are easy to install yourself.

If you are willing to put in some maintenance time, like painting and moisture protection, you will be very satisfied with wood frames and windows for your home.

 

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